I'm not crazy
baby-virgin:

Best sext I’ve ever gotten

baby-virgin:

Best sext I’ve ever gotten

curiousgeorgiana:

ophelia-tagloff:

What in the actual fuck?

All the kinks, right here. I can stop Tumbling forever.

And with this—good night.

Tom Hiddleston exercising Appreciation Post

Bonus :

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Baby Hiddles running

so-personal:

everything personal

so-personal:

everything personal

"Tom Hiddleston had done it [the ALS ice bucket challenge] once, and then the Internet was asking when I was going to do it and if I’d wear a white T-shirt apparently. And I actually did wear a white T-shirt for the last one, which they [the fans] were apparently quite happy about, so I was saving the Internet!”

ashtoniws:

ottermatopoeia:

mattniskanenseyebrows:

OCTOBER IS NEXT WEEK

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OCTOBER IS THIS WEEK
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OCTOBER IS TOMORROW

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tinycartridge:

Steampunk Game Boy ⊟

So many custom Game Boys on here lately — floral Game Boys, Ninja Turtle game boys, and even Darth Vader Game Boys. This one comes from Elise Siegwald and does not look like something that’s comfortable to hold, much less play. Pretty neat accessory if you ever find yourself on an airship, though.

BUY Game Boy games, upcoming releases

medresearch:

3-D Printed Prosthetics: Crowdsourcing a Solution for Disabled Kids
Johns Hopkins Medicine hosts event for 3-D printing enthusiasts who provide kids with affordable and durable prosthetic hands.

Most kids take swinging a baseball bat for granted. For children missing a hand or fingers due to congenital disabilities, that simple act can feel like reaching for the stars. Prosthetic limbs are expensive and quickly outgrown, leaving many families without options. But recently, a group of volunteers and professionals joined forces to put more durable, less constrictive and much less expensive prosthetic hands within the grasp of thousands of children — all for free.

On Sept. 28, 2014, Johns Hopkins Medicine hosted a symposium titled Prosthetists Meet Printers: Mainstreaming Open Source 3-D Printed Prosthetics for Underserved Populations. The event included workshops on strategy, techniques and policy regarding 3-D prosthetics. Johns Hopkins trauma surgeon Albert Chi, the e-NABLE organization, the Kennedy Krieger Institute and other leaders in medicine and industry donated 3-D printed prosthetics to children with upper limb differences.

The event brought 21st century practices and technologies to almost 500 prosthetists, printer owners, parents, kids and wounded warriors. It provided a forum for 3-D printer owners who donate free prosthetic limbs, allowing them to share specs and meet with the professionals and families who can benefit from their work.

Read more »

Photos: Three-year-old Rayden Kahae was born with fingers missing on his right hand because of a condition called amniotic band syndrome. (source URL)